Category: Public Policies

Report: Toward Market Cities: Lessons on Supporting Public Market Systems from Pittsburgh, Seattle, and Toronto

Food Justice | Management and Operations | Market Start-up and Development | Public Policies

Public markets systems in North America are both agile and fragile. When the coronavirus pandemic caused widespread stay-at-home orders and business closures, many markets across the continent stayed open, continuing to safely provide fresh and healthy food to residents as supply chains were strained and serve as an economic lifeline to farmers and other producers. This contribution to the resilience of our communities often took place despite limited, uncoordinated support from all levels of government.

It was in this extreme context that the Market Cities Initiative at Project for Public Spaces undertook this research effort to kickstart citywide market strategies in three North American cities—Seattle, Washington, and Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, in the United States, and Toronto, Ontario, Canada. With support from The Anne T. and Robert M. Bass Foundation, Project for Public Spaces provided each city with pro bono technical assistance and a small planning grant to audit each city’s existing market system, identify challenges and opportunities, and convene a broad group of stakeholders to advocate for new policy and governance structures.

This report includes background on the Market Cities Initiative and its research efforts to date, summaries of each local partner’s findings and recommendations, and broad takeaways for other cities looking to strengthen their market systems or leading their own Market City process.

 

 

Published November 10, 2020 PublicationState & Local Policy

Essential Services: State Declaration vs. CISA Guidance on Essential Critical Infrastructure Workforce

COVID-19 | Emergency Response | Public Policies | State/Local Guidelines
Example of state declaration:  New York

“This guidance is issued by the New York State Department of Economic Development d/b/a Empire State Development (ESD) and applies to each business location individually and is intended to assist businesses in determining whether they are an essential business. With respect to business or entities that operate or provide both essential and non-essential services, supplies or support, only those lines and/or business operations that are necessary to support the essential services, supplies, or support are exempt from the workforce reduction restrictions.”

Executive Order 202.6

 

Example of state deference to CISA guidance:  Georgia

“Critical infrastructure means a business, establishments, corporations, non-profit corporations, and organizations labeled by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security as ‘essential critical infrastructure workforce’ in guidance dated March 19, 2020 and revised on March 28, 2020… The operation of Critical Infrastructure shall not be impeded by county, municipal, or local ordinance.”

Executive Order

Guidance and FAQs for Statewide Shelter in Place Executive Order

 

Published May 06, 2020 State & Local Policy

Indiana Agriculture Information for Stay at Home Order

COVID-19 | Emergency Response | Public Policies | State/Local Guidelines
Published March 24, 2020 Download Resource Letter

Maine COVID19 Guidelines for Farmers’ Markets

COVID-19 | Emergency Response | Market Guidelines/Toolkits | Public Policies

Maine COVID19 Guidelines for Farmers’ Markets March 19, 2020

Published March 19, 2020 Download Resource Letter

San Mateo County Shelter In Place Statement:

COVID-19 | Emergency Response | Public Policies | State/Local Guidelines

San Mateo County affirms that farmers markets are essential services even as it issues “shelter in place” statement:

Published March 17, 2020 Download Resource Letter

Minnesota Farmers’ Market Association: Farmers’ Markets Exempt From Restaurant and Bar Closure

COVID-19 | Emergency Response | Public Policies | State/Local Guidelines
Published March 17, 2020 Download Resource Letter

Pleasantville Farmers Market Statement to Vendors on COVID-19

COVID-19 | Emergency Response | Market Guidelines/Toolkits | Public Policies

Pleasantville Farmers Market Statements to Vendors regarding the evolving situation on COVID-19

Published March 14, 2020 Download Resource Letter

Pleasantville Farmers Market Public Statement on COVID-19

COVID-19 | Emergency Response | Market Guidelines/Toolkits | Public Policies

Pleasantville Farmers Market Public Statement on COVID-19

Published March 14, 2020 Download Resource Letter

California Sign on Letter to Secretary Ross Regarding COVID-19

COVID-19 | Emergency Response | Public Policies

Letter, urging Secretary Ross to affirm Certified Farmers’ Markets’ essential role and equate them with grocery stores for the purposes of COVID19 containment policies.

Published March 14, 2020 Download Resource Letter

Utah Farmers Market FAQs

Public Policies

Does my Market need to be registered with the Utah Department of Agriculture and Food (UDAF)?

What are my responsibilities for the safety of foods being sold at my market?

The local Boy Scouts want to use my market to sell cookies they baked as a fund raiser. Can I let them?

Find answers to these questions (and many more) in this FAQ created by the Utah Department of Agriculture and Food.

Published November 03, 2017 Download Resource Topical guides