Category: Management and Operations

Farmers markets as a strategy for improving food environments pp 54-60

Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion (DEI) | Evaluation | Farm Business and Marketing | Food Justice | Public Policies | SNAP/EBT and Nutrition Programs

When designed effectively, supported by knowledge and an
understanding of the food-environment concept, government
policy and fiscal measures can positively influence what food
is available to consumers and lead to healthier dietary choices.
The food-environment concept, for example, has been crucial
to understanding and tackling food insecurity and food apartheid, as
described in this chapter.

Published February 25, 2021 Publisher Website Publication

Oregon Farmers Market Association 2020 Census Results

Anti-Racism Work | COVID-19 | Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion (DEI) | Evaluation | Impact Reports | Management and Operations | Partner Organizations | Promotion, Outreach, and Special Events | SNAP/EBT and Nutrition Programs | State Association Development | State/Local Guidelines | Vendor Fees and Market Finances | Webinars

Oregon Farmers Market Association recently released results from its 2020 census of farmers markets in a webinar titled “What Happened at Oregon Farmers Markets in 2020.” This presentation holds interesting stats about sales, attendance, and vendor level trends. It also dives into subjects like how Oregon farmers markets responded to COVID-19, widespread wildfires, and calls for racial justice in their communities during 2020.

Click the image below to watch a recording of the webinar.

Access the full presenter slides here.

Published February 19, 2021 Publisher Website Download Resource Impact Report or GraphicPresentationReportvideoWebinar

marketshare: Market Budget Scenario 1

Boards, Mission, and Governance | Management and Operations | Market Start-up and Development

Budget case study for a seasonal market with stall fees and sponsors. marketshare is a program of marketumbrella.org, which works to cultivate the field of public markets for public good. These free documents (called “shares”) are the best of “lessons learned” from public markets everywhere.

Published February 04, 2021 Download Resource Topical guides

EBT Point of Sale Device: Categories Overview

Farm Business and Marketing | Management and Operations | Market Start-up and Development | SNAP/EBT and Nutrition Programs

EBT Point of Sale Device Category Overview

This document will help you familiarize yourself with the categories of devices available – wired, wireless, and mobile, and help you start your search for the right device based on your cellular connectivity needs. This list is not exhaustive, nor is it a recommendation – these devices are examples of what we see commonly occurring in the Market and Farm Stand community.

Please refer to our Market Discovery Process to dive deeper into factors that may influence your technology choice. If you are seeking free or low cost EBT equipment, there are several states offering Free Wireless EBT Equipment to eligible markets and farmers — refer to our nationwide state-by-state guide for more information on what your state’s program offers, but remember, choosing the technology that works for your market before looking at cost is vital to your market’s EBT program.

If you’d like to share your market’s device or insights, please reach out to Katie@farmersmarketcoalition.org.

Published February 03, 2021 Download Resource

EBT Technology: Market Discovery Process

Farm Business and Marketing | Management and Operations | Market Start-up and Development | SNAP/EBT and Nutrition Programs

EBT Technology: Your Market’s Discovery Process

Your process in choosing a Third Party Processor (TPP, or sometimes referred to as a “Merchant Service Provider”) and device (whether it’s a tablet or a payment terminal) to process EBT can be tricky and depends on a wide range of factors. At worst, rushing into the wrong agreement may create huge problems down the road. Understanding your model’s specific needs are crucial for this process for choosing the right Third Party Processor and corresponding device. 

This document includes a list of questions intended to jumpstart your thinking on specific EBT technology needs at your market or on your farm — it’s best used in conjunction with real feedback from farmers and market operators who use particular devices, or have faced similar challenges. Reach out to technical assistance providers in your area, email katie@farmersmarketcoalition.org, or share questions through FMC’s listserv for specifics. 

Published February 02, 2021 Download Resource Topical guides

Report: Toward Market Cities: Lessons on Supporting Public Market Systems from Pittsburgh, Seattle, and Toronto

Food Justice | Management and Operations | Market Start-up and Development | Public Policies

Public markets systems in North America are both agile and fragile. When the coronavirus pandemic caused widespread stay-at-home orders and business closures, many markets across the continent stayed open, continuing to safely provide fresh and healthy food to residents as supply chains were strained and serve as an economic lifeline to farmers and other producers. This contribution to the resilience of our communities often took place despite limited, uncoordinated support from all levels of government.

It was in this extreme context that the Market Cities Initiative at Project for Public Spaces undertook this research effort to kickstart citywide market strategies in three North American cities—Seattle, Washington, and Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, in the United States, and Toronto, Ontario, Canada. With support from The Anne T. and Robert M. Bass Foundation, Project for Public Spaces provided each city with pro bono technical assistance and a small planning grant to audit each city’s existing market system, identify challenges and opportunities, and convene a broad group of stakeholders to advocate for new policy and governance structures.

This report includes background on the Market Cities Initiative and its research efforts to date, summaries of each local partner’s findings and recommendations, and broad takeaways for other cities looking to strengthen their market systems or leading their own Market City process.

 

 

Published November 10, 2020 Download Resource PublicationState & Local Policy

Measuring Racial Equity in the Food System: Established and Suggested Metrics

Anti-Racism Work | Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion (DEI) | Evaluation | Food Justice | Impact Reports

From the Michigan State University Center for Regional Food Systems.

This tool offers an expansive list of metrics that U.S. food system practitioners and food movement organizations can use to hold ourselves accountable for progress towards a more equitable food system. The metrics are either currently in use or are recommended by food system practitioners and food movement organizations in the United States. They are described, cited, and organized by themes: food access, food and farm business, food chain labor, and food movement.

Includes a PDF Guide and link to a webinar introduction to the guide.

 

Published November 05, 2020

Match the Market: Adapting Nutrition Incentives to Various Food Outlets

FMC | Management and Operations | Partner Organizations | SNAP/EBT and Nutrition Programs | Webinars

Meet the Presenters

Farmers Market Coalition and National Grocers Association TA Center in partnership with the Nutrition Incentive Hub have teamed up to present Match the Market: Adapting Nutrition Incentives to Various Food Outlets.

Nutrition incentive programs, which offer a “buy one get one” model to encourage customers to purchase more fruits and vegetables, have grown in popularity over the years. Although they originated in farmers markets, today nutrition incentives have expanded to reach several food outlets, including farm stands, CSAs, co-ops, and grocery stores. Throughout this expansion, administrators have discovered that there is no “one size fits all” approach.

This webinar will discuss how nutrition incentive practitioners can adapt and shift their programs to meet the unique needs of different types of food outlets. Statewide and regional organizations that expanded their nutrition incentive program from farm direct outlets to brick and mortar outlets (or vice versa) will discuss their rationale for this shift and how they adapted their program accordingly.  They will share the lessons they learned along the way, including tips on marketing, capacity support, and outlet funding requirements.

Attendees will learn:

  • Important considerations when shifting an existing nutrition incentive model to a new type of food outlet
  • The challenges faced when making the expansion between farm direct and brick and mortar outlets
  • The benefits of running incentive programs in both farm direct and brick and mortar outlets

Whether your organization is already preparing to implement a nutrition incentive program in a new type of outlet, or you’re simply interested in learning about the difference between how incentive programs work at farm direct and brick and mortar sites, this webinar will offer you insight into how you can successfully match the market.

Click the image below for the recording of the webinar

Access presentation slides here
Webinar Q and A

Published November 02, 2020

The Management Center: Equity and Inclusion

Anti-Racism Work | Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion (DEI)
How to talk about what’s going on with your team

“Acknowledge to your whole team what’s happening and why it matters. If there’s one lesson we’ve learned from the pandemic, it’s that who we are outside of work can’t be separated from who we are at work. And yet, many of us have mastered the art of compartmentalization. Sometimes, our privilege enables us to set aside horrific news and go about our days as usual. Often, compartmentalization is a survival mechanism. And for many Black staff, managers, and leaders, it is a suffocating performance of professionalism. As a leader or manager (especially if you’re not Black), merely naming what’s happening can help lift the burden of pretending that everything is okay.”

 

Published June 23, 2020 Publisher Website Download Resource Topical guides

Dismantling Racism Works Web Workbook

Anti-Racism Work | Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion (DEI)

This website is a web-based version of a workbook designed originally to support the Dismantling Racism workshop offered by Dismantling Racism Works, a training collaborative that is not offering workshops or consulting support at this time. The workshop was one step in a longer process developed initially by Kenneth Jones and Tema Okun over three decades ago. It builds on the work of many people, including (but not limited to) Andrea Ayvazian, Cynthia Brown, Bree Carlson, Beverly Daniel Tatum, Eli Dueker, Nancy Emond, Jonathan Henderson, Vivette Jeffries-Logan, Michelle Johnson, Jonn Lunsford, Jes Kelley, Sharon Martinas, jona olsson, Suzanne Plihcik, Christina Rivera-Chapman, David Rogers, James Williams, Sally Yee, as well as the work of the Peace Development Fund, Grassroots Leadership, Equity Institute Inc, the People’s Institute for Survival and Beyond, the Challenging White Supremacy workshop, the Lillie Allen Institute, the Western States Center, and the contributions of the many participants in the DR workshops over so many years. Many people’s thinking and experience have contributed to the resources you will find here.

 

 

Published June 23, 2020 Publisher Website Download Resource Other